H.I.P.S. in the Community

Body Image Seminar 2011

The Body Image Seminar was a great way to get the greater community involved. High school social worker and eating disorder therapist, Sara Thies came to speak about the media's effect on body image and how the evolution of current media correlated with the epidemic of poor body image. Dietician LaurieAnn Scher then spoke about dieting myths, such as 'No eating after 8PM' and held an open discussion with the group to falsify these myths. Lastly, author and eating disorder survivor Nicole Roberge came to speak about her experience with anorexia and her road to recovery.

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Sara Thies, high school social worker and therapist, speaks about the media's influence on people's body image, regardless of gender and age.

Nicole Roberge laughing after the seminar and telling us about her book, "Hang In There, Wherever 'There' Is."

High school faculty advisor Ms. Nicolett (left) stands with friend and speaker, Nicole Roberge, who tells her heart-wrenching story of her battle with anorexia and her road to recovery.

Sara Thies, high school social worker and therapist, speaks about the media's influence on people's body image, regardless of gender and age.

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Starting off the National Eating Disorder Association Fundraiser Walk in 2010a

Getting ready to walk!

Members of the 'Flaunt Your H.I.P.S.' team walking across the Brooklyn Bridge, participating in the NEDA Walk.

Starting off the National Eating Disorder Association Fundraiser Walk in 2010a

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Fat Talk Free Week 2011

Fat Talk Free Week is an annual, national event that H.I.P.S. celebrates every year. During Fat Talk Free Week, H.I.P.S. holds several various activities. In the past, H.I.P.S. encouraged the school community to sign a petition that encouraged Geico to remove a dangerously harmful commercial from the air. In addition, students wrote things they love about themselves on a white board and had a picture taken where that white board covered their face, representing that confidence and self-love overshadows physical characteristics.

National Eating Disorder Association Walks (2010 & 2011)
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H.I.P.S. participates in the National Eating Disorder Association annual walks in 2010 and 2011 to help raise money for NEDA and awareness of the harmful effects and growing epidemic of eating disorders.

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Fat Talk Free Week 2010

Fat Talk Free Week is an annual, national event that H.I.P.S. celebrates every year. During Fat Talk Free Week, H.I.P.S. holds several various activities. In the past, H.I.P.S. encouraged the school community to sign a petition that encouraged Geico to remove a dangerously harmful commercial from the air. In addition, students wrote things they love about themselves on a white board and had a picture taken where that white board covered their face, representing that confidence and self-love overshadows physical characteristics.

Raffle Selling!
Raffle Selling!

Members (L to R) Helena Rabasco, Ray Skyer, Olivia Anderson, Dylan Colbert, and Mariah Guevin (Co-President) help sell raffle tickets to raise money for the Manna Fund by having students donate money to pin self-love on the body.

More Raffles
More Raffles

Members (L to R) Julie Bryant and Erin help sell raffle tickets.

Raffle Selling!
Raffle Selling!

Members (L to R) Helena Rabasco, Ray Skyer, Olivia Anderson, Dylan Colbert, and Mariah Guevin (Co-President) help sell raffle tickets to raise money for the Manna Fund by having students donate money to pin self-love on the body.

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Pin the Self-Love on the Body Fundraiser

Skidmore H.I.P.S. raised over $200 for the Manna Fund by hosting a raffle. Students were encouraged to donate anywhere from $1 to $5 to pin the self-love on the body and get a gift bag. Everyone who donated was entered into a raffle for various drawings including a $50 gift card to a favorite local organic grocery store and café, Four Seasons.

The Manna Fund helps people who are seeking eating disorder treatment afford the care they need. Many insurance companies do not consider eating disorders "real" illnesses, and residential treatment can cost up to $30,000 per month, with many people needing 2-3 months care. The Manna Fund offers scholarships to help curb these costs. To learn more, go to www.mannafund.org.